Pre-Columbian, Peru Huari Wari Culture Poly Chrome Pottery Olla, Ca 500 to 1000 CE, #969

Pre-Columbian, Peru Huari Wari Culture Poly Chrome Pottery Olla, Ca 500 to 1000 CE, #969

$4,700.00

CulturalPatina maintains a large shop on Etsy with over 800 Museum quality products and original art. Our focus is primarily on American Western art, but we also have a sizable collection on Naga beadwork and textiles, along with other tribal from around the world. Clicking on the ‘Shop on Etsy’ button will take you to that section of our shop where you can see similar works. If this item has sold, you should be able to find something else of the same quality and price range.

000

Pre-Columbian

Peru Huari/Wari culture

Poly chrome Pottery Olla

969. Description: Pre-Columbian, Peru Huari/Wari Culture Poly Chrome Pottery Olla, Ca 500 to 1000 CE

Dimensions: Approximately 10’ x 10 inches

Condition: Excellent condition overall, with a couple of nicks on the neck of the vessel.

Provenance: Personal collection of D. Brining

All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

The Wari (Spanish: Huari) were a Middle Horizon civilization that flourished in the south-central Andes and coastal area of modern-day Peru, from about AD 500 to 1000. (The Wari culture is not to be confused with the modern ethnic group and language known as Wari’, with which it has no known link.)

The Wari (Spanish: Huari) were a Middle Horizon civilization that flourished in the south-central Andes and coastal area of modern-day Peru, from about AD 500 to 1000.[1] (The Wari culture is not to be confused with the modern ethnic group and language known as Wari’, with which it has no known link.)

Wari, as the former capital city was called, is located 11 km (6.8 mi) north-east of the modern city of Ayacucho, Peru. This city was the center of a civilization that covered much of the highlands and coast of modern Peru. The best-preserved remnants, beside the Wari Ruins, are the recently discovered Northern Wari ruins near the city of Chiclayo, and Cerro Baul in Moquegua. Also well-known are the Wari ruins of Pikillaqta (“Flea Town”), a short distance south-east of Cuzco en route to Lake Titicaca.

History

Early on, the Wari expanded their territory to include the ancient oracle center of Pachacamac, though it seems to have remained largely autonomous. Later the Wari became dominant in much of the territory of the earlier Moche and later Chimu cultures. The reason for this expansion has been debated; it is believed to have been driven by religious conversion, military conquest, or the spread of agricultural knowledge (specifically terrace agriculture).

As a result of centuries of drought, the Wari culture began to deteriorate around 800 A.D. Archaeologists have determined that the city of Wari was dramatically depopulated by 1000 A.D., although it continued to be occupied by a small number of descendant groups. Buildings in Wari and in other government centers had doorways that were deliberately blocked up, as if the Wari intended to return, someday when the rains returned.[2] But by the time this happened, the Wari had faded from history. In the meantime, the dwindling residents of the Wari cities ceased all major construction. Archaeological evidence shows significant levels of inter-personal violence, suggesting that warfare and raiding increased amongst rival groups upon the collapse of the Wari state structure.[3] With the collapse of the Wari, the Late Intermediate Period is said to begin.

Government

Little is known about the details of the Wari administrative structure, as they did not appear to use a form of written record. But, the emphasis on homogeneous administrative architecture and evidence for significant social stratification suggests a complex socio-political hierarchy.

The discovery in early 2013 of an undisturbed royal tomb, El Castillo de Huarmey, offers new insight into the social and political influence of the Wari during this period. The variety and extent of the burial items accompanying the three royal women indicates a culture with significant material wealth and the power to dominate a significant part of northern costal Peru for many decades.

Architecture

During its expansion period, the Wari state established architecturally distinctive administrative centers in many of its provinces. These centres are clearly different from the architecture of Tiwanaku, which is believed to have been a more federalized state by some scholars (such as John W. Janusek). Using these administrative centers, the Wari greatly influenced the surrounding countryside. They created new fields with terraced field technology and invested in construction of a major road network. Several centuries later, when the Inca began to expand their empire, they drew on both of these innovations.
(Source Wikipedia)

 

Materials used:  

 

 

Dennis Brining of Cultural Patina - Fairfax Station, Virginia, USA

Dennis Brining of CulturalPatina Gallery – Virginia, USA

Dennis has had a passion for collecting all things beautiful and unique his entire life and would like to share some of these items with others having a similar interest through his Culturalpatina Gallery. The gallery has representative items from the American Southwest, Asia, Middle East, Central and South America, and Nagaland in North Eastern India.

Dennis strives to offer the best items that he has collected or can find for sale to both the casual and/or discriminating collector of unique cultural items from each of these areas of the world. He also tries to focus on vintage, prehistoric, and historic items if he can find them. His primary interest is in pottery, textiles/weavings, western art, bronze sculptures, and extraordinary pieces of adornment. The gallery currently has the work of over 40 artists in these areas of interest.

Culturalpatina Gallery has the largest collection of Ron Stewart art in the world, and represents Ron on the East Coast. Here you will find some of his earliest paintings to some of his most recent ones that have not been shown in public.

Culturalpatina Gallery also has the second largest collection of authentic Naga Indian Art in the US. It is all authentic, meaning that it was made by the Naga and used in their cultural ceremonies. The majority of the items shown were collected prior to 1982, when the Naga converted to Christianity and are museum quality.

Culturalpatina’s Market items on Artizan link over to the shop on Etsy. The selection here on Artizan is an example of a much larger collection. If this item has sold, you should be able to find something similar in the same price range in the main shop. Do not hesitate to contact Dennis with any questions.

CulturalPatina Gallery

I have had a passion for collecting all things beautiful and unique my entire life and would like to share these items with others having a similar interest. I have representative items from the American South West, Asia, Central and South America, East Africa and Nagaland in North Eastern India. I strive to offer the best items that I have collected or can find for sale from numerous sources to the discriminating collector of unique cultural items from each of these areas of the world. My primary interest is in pottery, textiles, bronze sculptures, and extraordinary pieces of adornment. All sales are via the internet only. Products from my shop here on Artizan Made link over to my shop on Etsy.

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